[book review] The Stash Plan by Laura Prepon

March 6, 2016

It’s written by Laura Prepon (the actress) and her health care professional Elizabeth Troy (integrative nutritionist, functional medicine, yoga & thai massage teacher, chinese meridian theory).

I read it in one night and liked this diet/health book for a number of reasons.

SHORT VERSION:
Written by someone with experience. Clearly explains what good and bad food do to our body. What kind of exercises are healing and what kind are not. Priceless info on bone broth and meridian stretching.

LONG VERSION:
Pros:
1. It’s written by a person who has had direct experience with health problems and overcame them after much trial and error. I’m a fan of these types of books rather than ones written by experts who quote studies but never overcame the issues themselves.

Laura, like me, has suffered from weight issues, poor digestion, bloat, etc for 15+ yrs. She has also tried the same things I have: calorie counting, hardcore exercising, paleo diet, vegan diet, food combining, and even HCG Diet!

2. It combines many of the things I’ve been researching as well. Clean real food and Chinese meridian theory. Talks highly of bone broths, which I’ve never tried but have read about.

3. It does a great job explaining the dangers of gmos, benefits of clean food, antioxidants, and how the digestive process works from the moment you put something in your mouth all the way to when it comes out the other end. These are all things I had never read before.

Cons:
1. Only one. The name!
I think it refers to stashing good food by batch cooking twice a week. A better name would have been something that refers to bone broths, meridians, stretching, clean food all at the same time. Minor quibble.

Since the name is kinda confusing, I’ll quickly summarize what the book is about.

The book is about three things.
1. Clean Food
Organic, non-gmo, grassfed, real food. If you’re familiar with the paleo diet, whole30, the perfect health diet, or any of those clean eating plans, this is similar. The Stash Plan is lower in fat though. This is because high fat diets tend to tax the liver and gallbladder. The book’s premise is that people with digestive & weight issues have overtaxed livers and gallbladders. The goal is to heal these two organs.

Three major meals consist of a carb (quinoa, millet, brown rice, sweet potatoes), veggies, and protein (beef, turkey, chicken, bison, seafood, etc). And two snacks in between. Stuff like soaked almonds, almond butter, granny smith apples, blueberries, avocado, walnuts, etc.

They recommend batch cooking twice a week. Enough food for the next three days. Includes recipes for 6 stash cooking sessions.

2. Bone Broth
Made from grassfed organic beef, chicken, fish bones. Loved reading about the benefits. Think of bone broth as liquid vitamins that your body can absorb easily. Heals the body, hair, skin, joints, gut. Has collagen, gelatin, minerals, etc. Making my first batch today.

3. Meridian Stretching
I’m familiar with meridians through Donna Eden’s Energy Medicine book. But I had never heard of stretches that help meridians and organs before. Elizabeth teaches 14 stretches that heal the liver and gallbladder meridians. I tried em for the first time last night and felt energized right away! They work.

Gentle exercises are also recommended for healing. Rebounding, yoga, abdominal breathing. Unhelpful exercises: squats, stairmasters, high intensity cardio, etc.

Resources:
The Stash Plan – book
Laura Prepon Interview – naked food magazine, good summary of topics from book
Bone Broth Recipe + Summary – Sally Fallon, Weston A Price. Elizabeth and Laura reference Sally’s work.

………………………..

Update on Bones:
Some folks on amazon were wondering where to buy grass-fed beef bones.

Whole Foods Non-GrassFed
In their frozen meat section (next to raw meat counter), there were packets of frozen beef bones, rated as Step 1 (no cages, no crates, no crowding). These are NOT grass-fed but I was in a rush and didn’t feel like searching in different stores. If whole foods doesn’t have em, no other place here (Chicago Burbs) will.

Cost was $3.99/lb, each package weighing around 2lbs. I bought two packets of these, and then 1/2lb of grass-fed bone-in short ribs from behind the counter, $8.99/lb. Couple of carrots, few celery stalks, garlic, ginger. Followed Sally Fallon’s recipe and cooked for about 15hrs.

Turned out well. Froze most of em in the freezer. Tossing out the fat on top because bones were not grass-fed.

Grass-Fed Bones Online
I did ask the guy behind the meat counter at Whole Foods if they had grassfed bones back there. He looked at me like I asked him if he wears women’s underwear.

Some people recommend going to butcher shops.

There are some websites that ship grass-fed bones. I will try them next time. Cost below doesn’t include shipping.

1. Slanker’s Texas Grassfed Beef
$5.59-$6.99/lb

2. White Oak Pastures
$6.97/lb

3. Baldwin Beef
$3.5/lb for 10lbs

4. Halal Pastures
$4/lb

Reusing Bones Multiple Times
According to Perfect Health Diet, we can reuse the bones multiple times. Keep using them until they disintegrate. I froze my original batch of bones for next usage.