Salt Lamps are Bad Feng Shui

February 23, 2016

You know that moment in that movie where that guy realizes the other guy is Keyser Soze?? I had that moment with my salt lamp a few minutes ago, which I thought was my harmless friend all this time.

Before getting to that, first things first…

How I started using Salt Lamps
I’ve had one of these bad boys on the table next to my bed for 3 years.

The lamp looks cool. Provides a warm orange glow in the evening. The light inside is supposed to heat the salt, creating negative ions. Salt is also supposed to purify the area and blah blah blah other benefits.

saltlampI think I originally read about them in Colette Baron Reid’s book: Weight Loss For People Who Feel Too Much. Salt is used as a cleansing method for highly sensitive folks. She recommends salting your food (with the good kinda salt), taking salt baths, using heated salt bricks under your feet, and salt lamps.

Later, I saw them being used in my massage therapist’s office. She’s also a highly sensitive person and is into Abraham Hicks and the spiritual life. Great minds think alike?

Finally, I saw them being used on the Joe Rogan Podcast. I figured I was in good company by now. Salt lamps were cemented in my brain as a “duh, of course they’re good” category. Along with puppies, kittens, and sunshine.

Weird Salt Lamp Dream
I was sitting on my bed, surfing wrestling websites and listening to a podcast talking about why Shane McMahon vs Undertaker at Wrestlemania is a terrible idea. I disagree, but that’s for another time.

I craned my neck over to the salt lamp for no reason at all and had a sudden flashback of a dream from last nite.

In my dream, I was looking at the salt lamp, which had turned from a bright pink color to a rotting putrid green. And felt disgusted looking at this fungus like thing.

What the hell?!

Why Salt Lamps are Bad Feng Shui
So I started searching “salt lamp feng shui” and read as much as possible. Could it be that salt lamps are bad feng shui? Or that they should not be used in bedrooms? I had never considered this before.

Luckily the search didn’t take long.

Lillian Too (my favorite feng shui teacher) explains that salt lamps, while pretty, are bad bad bad.

Salt is a great cleansing agent especially if you are moving into a new home or when used in space clearing rituals. It’s particularly good when you need to remove stagnant energy from a piece of old furniture or next to your bedside as described above.

Salt lamps on the other hand are very harmful and do not have the power to cleanse. In fact, salt lamps will soak up all of your chi energy and you will feel tired and listless. They absorb all the good energy from the room including yours! Best to remove them if you are using them now. source

Kathryn Weber, another Feng Shui practitioner, has this to say:

Like the salt cures, these lamps too are quite drying. When they’re heated with a light element, it makes them even more drying. It’s the drying effect of salt lamps that creates problems such as lethargy and despondency, and a lethargic, despondent atmosphere in your home.

Unless you’re a side of ham, you don’t need to be dried out, or live in a drying atmosphere. Most houses (and often people) suffer from is not having enough water and water energy — and the salt just dries them out more. This means your wealth, like your skin, dries up too, as well as your opportunities. Have a salt lamp? Throw it away. source

Final Thoughts
Salt represents earth energy and should only be used sparingly as a cleansing cure. It’s too strong to be used as a regular staple because it absorbs all energy, good and bad.

If everything in your life is going harmoniously and you’re using a salt lamp, then no need to change anything. If life isn’t going as well as you want, try getting rid of that salt lamp and see if things turn around. It’s a very simple and free experiment to conduct.

I removed mine this evening and will report later how it goes. To be honest, I already kinda feel better.